The NHS

Part 7: World Builder

With a handful of campaign challenges in place it becomes very easy to rapidly build campaigns and adventures that fit into your group’s plans as outlined during campaign planning/ by player profiles.

World building can start at any level within the tables that follow. So a dungeon can be made and the world may develop from bottom to top. Alternatively, cosmology, physics and metaphysics can deliver a top down approach, which shapes a physical world that is then detailed through further levels including people, places and the events they generate.

The earlier step-by-step on building adventures is laid out with a top down approach, but any of the tables can be taken as a starting point. The GM can then build in any direction and still connect-up different levels within a logical hierarchy.

The same applies to campaign building and designing a campaign could start with anything from an interstellar effect like low gravity that has massively widespread effects to starting with a piece of bloodstained cloth and building upwards from there.

 

Creating worlds that are reasonably authentic tends to be easier using a top-down approach. However, it’s a lot quicker to try out a regional map and then use what comes out of that to consider global effects as a region turns into a world.

So players/ GMs can take any starting point, but the approach and order suggested here is to place campaign challenges at the heart of campaign designs, before adding other more global and more detailed levels of description.

This method places players’ preferences - in terms of what they wish their PCs to do or to get involved in - as a spine running through the design of the campaign. This is not intended to be a rigid arrangement, as apart from anything else players’ preference may stray across any boundaries a GM tries to set.

Nevertheless, by placing campaign challenges - and the events and expectations they generate - ahead of physical environments or economic conditions the game-world is fitting the players’ plans rather than vice-versa.

Instead of trying to construct a campaign or adventure from the ground-up or top-down, GMs can take the group’s overall plans and easily select cosmologies, climates, cultures, places, events and characters that are consistent with the campaign challenges selected by players.

In addition, having selected a campaign challenge, such as warfare and sieges, a lot of what follows at other levels or layers becomes largely self-selecting. For instance, wars typically involve defensive structures, widespread hardship and desperate measures.

With much of a setting or campaign outlined in this way a GM is free to concentrate on adding her/ his own unique, challenge-focused gameplay to the challenge-based framework.

There are whole books of world building lists available, so the following tables are not exhaustive. These lists do, however, offer plenty of choices without becoming overwhelming.

 

Campaign Challenges Table

No.

Campaign Challenges        

Details

1

Conquest and Colonization

 

2

Counter Insurgency

 

3

Crime Fighting

 

4

Disasters and Crisis Management

 

5

Dawn of the Undead

 

6

Enterprise and Commerce

 

7

Espionage and Infiltration

 

8

Internecine Warfare

 

9

Marine Life

 

10

Massive Meteor Strikes

 

11

Mysteries and Investigations

 

12

Research and Experimentation

 

13

Revolution

 

14

Survival Scenarios

 

15

Warfare and Sieges

 

 

Landscapes

The dramatic physical locations chosen as backdrops for RPG campaigns and adventures are frequently based on real world landscapes and landmarks. For example, spectacular mountain ranges, huge underworld grottos, temperamental volcanoes and treacherous swamps seem to be particular favorites among GMs.

GMs will often try to vary physical locations by presenting an exaggerated version of a familiar terrain, by adding complications such as extreme weather and/ or by overlaying magical effects. These approaches can be very helpful, as they take play beyond the limits of real world locations without requiring everyone to learn how to operate in and identify with a completely alien environment.

The range of options opened up by a certain amount of remixing can be considerable. For example, unusual but fairly authentic outcomes can result from placing a city on a ship, situating a volcano on the shores of an ocean or simply filling a swamp with enchanted gel.

 

Players generally find it easy to adapt a PC’s play to take account of an unusual twist on familiar landscapes and terrains. More complete or outlandish locations are, perhaps, best used sparingly, as clashes between the underlying physical laws of the game-world and players’ understanding of those laws may undermine a game’s sense of authenticity or internal consistency.

GMs can easily introduce further variety by linking gameplay to dynamic features of the physical landscape. This already happens quite frequently when, for example, the gameplay assumes that night follows day or that the seasons match those in the real world.

There’s really a very wide range of climate variations, infrequent events and deforming landscapes for GMs and players to explore. Shifting glaciers, avalanches, seasonal tides, flash floods, lahars, monsoon conditions or mudflats aren’t going to feature constantly, but they are typical of the kinds of physical features and events that can halt an advancing army or sweep a convoy off a mountain trail.

When it comes to putting a GM’s own spin on cosmologies physics/ metaphysics, climates and landscapes it is usually much simpler to add specific effects instead of trying to map out or calculate a wholly accurate simulation. For example, the following ‘night and day’ environment offers up opportunities to explore contrasting worldviews.

 

The planet or world is split between permanent night and permanent day. This alone sets up two sets of social, political, economic and ritual worlds, which offer plenty of dramatic contrasts on land, in the air and beneath any waves. The resulting climate and terrain, social structures, vegetation and wildlife – along with a good many other conditions - are going to be focused on or specialized around contrasts between diurnal, nocturnal and, possibly, crepuscular or magical lifestyles. Anyone looking for extra options can easily throw in a twilight region.

Given the extent of the influence the landscape can have on play, it is clearly possible for GMs to get a tighter match between physical locations and ongoing quests or plots by linking quest and plot development to the changing features of the landscape.

Different RPG genres and settings are suited to different physical environments, so the landscapes that fit with fantasy games are likely to be quite distinct from, for example, those that fit into SciFi games. Whatever the genre, the same principles apply in terms of trying to latch on to the familiar, while introducing novelty and variety.

For instance, a GM designing a SciFi setting is probably going to deliver a fairly compelling setting simply by reading a few pages on the incredible environments of the solar system and exo-planets.

A GM who prefers to try to come up with something entirely out of the blue every time out is, perhaps, going to find that the effects of the physical conditions are difficult to apply consistently.

 

Gazetteers

Before continuing on to step-by-step campaign design it is worth mentioning that compiling a basic gazetteer is a helpful way to set out some of the more obvious and widely known features of a setting or campaign. The example presented here tries to illustrate how quite a short summary of local conditions can quickly sketch out the basic landscape and politics of a region.

There are many possible ways to enhance a gazetteer very quickly. These might include adding images showing similar terrain, adding campaign notes or including tables such as the Wilderness Encounters Table shown earlier.

There is no need to present players with information in advance or to spend time on a detailed gazetteer. However, it doesn’t take long to prepare one using a template such as the Eaglesridge Gazetteer and they can be useful for GMs interested in having a core document that pulls together the key features and events of a campaign as play progresses. Clearly, including rough maps and images of the landscape and/ or locations will make for a more complete presentation.

 

The Eaglesridge Gazetteer

The Eaglesridge region is secure territory equipped with good quality roads. Four bridges span the two major rivers that cut down through the center of the countryside. These bridges shorten journeys between the settlements to regular distances of roughly 20 miles.

 

The Countryside

Those exploring throughout much of the Eaglesridge region can expect to encounter travelers near the major crossroads marked on the map as jewels. Some caution is urged when journeying further from Eaglesridge, as this is frontier territory and a variety of monsters can be encountered in overgrown or wilderness areas.

 

The Territory

Chapter

Chapter is an area of woods and grasslands gifted to an order of knights for their part in the capture and defense of Eaglesridge and Ravenswharf at the point when the region was first torn from the wilderness.

The land produces grain and orchard fruits through the efforts of monks and householders attached to the knights' holy order.

At present relations between the Overlord of Eaglesridge and the knights are strained to such an extent that the order will not fight in defense of the Overlord's territory.

 

Eaglesridge

The prosperous merchant city of Eaglesridge holds some or all territorial rights over most of the surrounding region. Almost 20,000 humans live inside the city walls.

The city rests on the top of a long line of hills, which form a continuous ridge from north to south. The site enjoys panoramic views over the local landscape, but few eagles soar over the crags and outcrops, as they were considered a nuisance and fed poisoned bait until most died.

A hereditary Overlord, Ascaric, owns the surrounding region by right of arms. He wrested the holding from the wilderness 27 years ago. His grip over the region is secured by a force of 1,500 mercenaries. The Chapter Knights, who were instrumental in the capture of the once dragon infested land, have become a much weakened force in recent times.

 

Foundry

Local iron deposits and silver from the Sapphire area are melted-down and forged in the Overlord's foundry. The workshops produce a wide range of goods, including weapons, armor, farming equipment, mining equipment and many household and luxury goods.

 

Orchid

Orchid is an area of grasslands and orchards. The orchards produce pears, apples and peaches, which sell for good prices throughout the region and beyond.

The territory gained its name from the varieties of orchids which once thrived there. The orchids were prized by the dragons and the land was cleared of orchids to discourage their visits.

The current landholder is the sister of the Overlord of Eaglesridge. Ironically, the self-styled 'Lady Orchid' personally supervises the removal and destruction of any orchid stems starting to grow within the area.

 

Ravenswharf

Ravenswharf is a frontier port packed full of explorers, merchants and pioneering families seeking freeholds. The current population ranges from 15,000 in winter to 25,000 in high summer.

Sapphires, silver, fruits, wheat and timber are exported through a busy harbor, which imports gold, spices and alchemical supplies.

The city has grown rapidly in recent years. This is largely the result of rich merchants supporting a burgeoning middle class, which provides services and luxury goods for the wealthy few.

The city and its surroundings are controlled from Eaglesridge, with a Harbor Master looking after much of the day-to-day running of the city and its harbor.

 

Royal Lodge

The Royal Lodge area is a wooded, craggy estate used for hunting deer and wilder animals. That includes monsters hiding in lairs to the southwest. The territory gets its name from a complex of hunting lodges and cabins known as The Royal Lodge, which belongs to the Overlord of Eaglesridge. He uses the complex to impress important visitors and to charge the wealthy for expensive hunting holidays.

The 'Royal' tag is not sanctioned by any recognized kingdom, but serves to emphasize the luxury accommodation and, perhaps, the Overlord of Eaglesridge's wish that he should be declared king – turning the region from a territorial confederacy into a fully-fledged nation state.

 

Sapphire

Much of the wealth used to build Eaglesridge and Ravenswharf came from the region's sapphire mines. These are deep mines, which require a lot of investment to access the rich veins of sapphire and silver buried far below ground.

Tunneling operations have created countless abandoned mineshafts and pitheads, which are quickly occupied by creatures suited to the underground conditions. It would be expensive to protect the whole area against bandits and monsters, so defensive fortifications are built around working pitheads.

 

Shadowcaster

Shadowcaster is a remote area and for the most part the domain of a magician who somehow came to hold rights over this section of the Eaglesridge region. Small villages and cottages are dotted over the more southern parts of the area; and these are administered by Eaglesridge. However, the more mountainous north is largely deserted and home to a sorcerer's tower.

Travelers have encountered monsters within the Shadowcaster area – but few, if any, seem to break out into areas inhabited by humans. Travelers' rumors and speculation also talks of some kind of ruins or ancient relics located to the north, but the rumors are unconfirmed. Most talk on the subject simply warns against wandering into the area.

 

Thornwood

Thornwood is a dense forest, which supplies much of the timber for building in Ravenswharf and Eaglesridge. There is also a high demand for timber to support the mining activities in the Sapphire area.

Several small settlements on the edge of the forest house woodcutters and wagon teams. These are all positioned on the northern edge of the forest and no one enters the forest unnecessarily. It is widely believed that Thornwood is haunted and those who venture in only do so in groups of a dozen or more.

 

The workers' fear is, perhaps, part superstition, part self-fulfilling prophecy - as any accidents, mishaps or animal attacks are invariably blamed on or linked to 'ghosts' and 'monsters'. However, there is much talk of a cursed field of barrows hidden deep inside the forest. Others claim to have come upon friends left dying from terrible claw and pincer wounds inflicted by creatures of the forest.

 

The Build

A few campaign challenges and a rough idea of the nature of the physical world is enough to start to build a campaign by selecting or rolling options that set out more detail.

 

Exotic and Alien Worlds

The easiest default world is an earth-like planet in a solar system with oceans, continents and relatively mild weather systems. However, effects can be applied that are unlikely to accurately simulate exotic or alien environments, but which can shape play through fairly obvious and recurring physical and psychological outcomes.

Less is often more with these very widespread effects, as anything unusual that gets included typically has to be applied consistently - without surrendering the player choice derived from players’ gameplay preferences/campaign challenges or interrupting the flow of play.

 

Exotic and Alien Worlds Table

D12

Landscape

Possible Effects

1

Atmospherics

An adjustment such as an oxygen-enriched atmosphere can be applied at a planetary - or more local - level without getting into any further complications. Its influence within the game might be as limited as greater strength or stamina and significantly larger birds and insects. Alternatively, the widespread effects could be extended to consider the effects of all that extra oxygen on fires, explosions and other chemical reactions. Other obvious options include widespread or planetary weather systems

2

Continental

Continents are going to appear in many campaigns and are included later as part of detailing physical landscapes. They can, however, also serve as cut-down versions of exotic or alien worlds. They typically form boundaries for plagues, crops, wildlife/ creatures, weather systems, catastrophes, migrations and terrain. It is relatively straightforward to try to use quite authentic science to describe continents, but for fantasy worlds it’s quicker to apply uniform effects across a continent, such as a Snowball or Volcano World approach.

3

Exo-Planetary

Less is known about planets located around distant planetary systems. However, data has started to pour in and could help to suggest new kinds of planetary systems and/ or imaginative options

4

Galactic

At this level effects are still spread across vast areas and large, but local, conditions might be open to unusual forms of radiation that mutate or water with strange properties

5

Ice World

Covering everything with ice, snow and blizzards works in much the same way as a volcanic setting. The physical environment has a strong influence across the setting and, in the case of an Ice World, the conditions are well-suited to gritty, survival scenarios

6

Intergalactic

An entire region of space and everything in it can form a pocket environment within a universe where further adjustments to conditions operate. Alternatively, large regions may be effected by different conditions, e.g. regions with amplified solar winds that disrupt communications

7

Metaphysics

Completely magical worlds are an easy way to simplify campaign building. If castles sit happily on clouds or you want to turn PCs into cartoons a magical solution is the quick option. Some players may question the internal consistency of such settings, but a little negotiation can usually offset that

8

Night and Day

As discussed earlier, the planet, the solar system or even the galaxy is split between permanent night and day. This alone sets up two sets of social, political, economic and ritual landscapes, which offer plenty of dramatic contrasts. For example, worship of the stars might predominate in the dark zone, while solar religions operate in the daylight zone

9

Planetary

Working on a planetary basis sticks with the familiar solar system model, while inviting the use of effects based on activity on the planet. Distorted global weather systems, seas that act as chemical lakes and life-forms adapted to such environments are obvious options. Conditions on planets and moons across the solar system can contribute to campaigns – along with theories on how these conditions might work in-game

10

Snowball World

The snow is so continual in these worlds that whole cities are buried in the advancing drifts. Survival depends on either melting the snow on a regular basis, tunneling or moving with the snow

11

Universal

Effects that act across an entire universe are good for adjusting physics and/ or metaphysics, e.g. unusual gravity or alternative magnetism. This usually forks from known physics

12

Volcano World

Whether imagined or based on scientific principle a highly volcanic world offers a great variety of local and global adjustments to the physical environment. Lahars, pyroclastic clouds, dust, blasts, seismic disturbances and lava lakes become the order of the day.  This can be is applied to a planet, a continent or a world sat on a coin that gets flipped by a giant every now and again. The volcanic conditions effectively zoom in on gameplay that involves dealing with a hazardous environment, which can in itself be enough to flavor a campaign with cultures highly adapted to dealing with the conditions

 

Using Signature Events

We can add similarly large-scale/ regional/ global customizations with genre specific effects in the form of magical or high technology landmarks and locations. These can be seen as a form of signature events, i.e. possibly recurring, probably significant plot elements and/ or campaign themes. These are seeded within a campaign at the upper levels or layers of design – either before or after deciding on terrain and landscapes.

The exotic and alien worlds in the table above are in effect a type of signature event and players of Corruption will be familiar with signature events in the form of Seeds of Corruption and Seeds of Wonder; which rapidly drop thematic landmarks, events, items and monsters into campaigns.

Ultimately it’s how a signature event is used – to add continuity and customization – that defines the term rather than the particular form of the event. They are worth emphasizing at an early stage in campaign planning and design, because they form part of the fabric of a campaign and are much easier to integrate and work with when introduced at roughly the same time as campaign challenges.

Put another way, the various tables can be arranged into a consistent order – which may mean putting what players want to spend time on and recurring favorites at the very top of the system or stacking climate and terrain above them and working down.

Alternatively, as a GM becomes more familiar with moving around and between levels it gets easier to treat the tables not as a hierarchy, but as a system where adventures and settings can be constructed by moving freely between the different levels.

 

Signature Events Table

D6

Landscape

Possible Effects

1

Armada

For most of the year the slave and pirate ships that form the Armada are scattered along the trade routes they prey upon. They far-flung fleet gathers in full strength twice/ year. In late summer they form a massive raiding fleet to plunder harvests and in winter the ships are lashed together for a winter tryst. Several hundred full ships, of galley or larger size, act as a loose confederation and differences between factions are settled at the winter trysts – as part of the entertainment. The mix of criminals, pressed-men, slaves and servants makes life very cheap during trysts and the Armada as a whole uses a dragon standard to warn those they order to surrender that no quarter will be given to those who refuse

2

Blackwash

The world, continent or region under exploration is a massive subterranean swamp where life is lived in tunnels and fortified crannogs. These offer some protection against huge creatures lurking within the swamp

3

Night and Day

This option appears again to emphasize that the same effects can be applied on different levels/ scales. One half of the territory is always in night, the other always in day. The night side is highly adapted to very low light in the manner of creatures living in the absolute darkness of deep oceans and/ or bioluminescent life. The other side is adapted to constant daylight, e.g. plant life may produce less CO2 and oxygen levels could be raised as a result

4

Passion Flowers

The region has seasonal displays of colorful blossoms which litter the ground and make their way into the water supply soon after flowering. The petals dissolve in rivers, streams and uncovered wells. Those drinking the water across the whole region become unusually emotional. The type of emotion affected seems linked to the color of the flowers that have bloomed most recently. Red blossom makes creatures fearless, while yellow blossom makes them cowardly. Green blossom brings on jealousy, while purple blossom leads to extremes of passion. Other colors may have unrecorded effects as a consequence of those effects

5

Secret Garden

These labyrinthine gardens have magical fountains, orchards bearing restorative fruits and enchanted sundials - among other features. The standard benefits are mild, but those who bury treasure in the garden soon find they gain greater benefits from the enchanted items. If enough treasure is buried magical effects may become persistent or permanent. The garden’s roots consume treasure as soon as it’s buried

6

Treetops

The trees in these forests are tall enough to offer different environments at different altitudes. The forest floor might be a largely gloomy level where fallen branches and foliage form a landscape of dried and twisted sticks and leaves. Above that tree houses - linked by walkways and chariot paths - may support large communities that harvest nuts and fruit from the trees. The currency here might be some form of ivory or tusk large enough to use to make incredibly light chariots with enchanted carvings

The following examples are more complete options which suggest ways to design your own selection of signature events to build continuity, i.e. ensuring players’ preferences and characters’ histories are carried forward on a regular, if sometimes infrequent, basis.

 

Eldritch Battlefields

Ancient battlefields where colossal armies have met in vast conflicts that raged over many miles and many years sometimes etch themselves into the landscape. The remains of such a battle that were not plundered at the time lie fairly close to the surface and present a series of hazards:

Slaughter pits that seep blood on to the surface can form ghoulish quicksand traps where victims will flow down into the ghastly residue of torn bone and partly petrified flesh lying below.

Bridges within such regions may be built or formed largely of flesh and bone, which can react to the presence of the living by animating as swarms of skeletons, ghouls and zombies.

Plants growing over the battlefield are likely to be affected; yielding an acidic, black sap which makes them inedible. Boiling the plants down eventually yields a concentrated sticky residue that is able to rapidly corrode wood and non-magical metals in the manner of an acid – providing it’s fresh.

Wells may appear to have clear water at the surface, but buckets lowered deeper into a well are likely to become tangled in the honeycombed latticework formed by the many skeletons of those packed into the bottom of the well. Drawing water from these wells appears to have no unusual effects unless the water is allowed to form a standing pool or puddle of twice the width of the top of the container used to draw the water. At that point the water will turn red then blacken, as a creature of the night emerges from the surface and attacks those nearby.

Getting rid of such a beast is quite easy, but one will appear each round until the water is mopped up or broken up to form a smaller surface area. Unfortunately, trying to freeze the water forms an icy version of the creature, which has its defense improved by D6 as a result of the layer of ice that forms over it. Adding fire to try to burn off the water is as bad, because the creatures become immolated in flames and cause an extra 2D6 when inflicting wounds. Even those making hand-to-hand attacks take a D6 extra damage from an immolated creature of the night.

 

Paradise

These coral reefs are thought to form in locations where an evil being or item, such as a devil or a forbidden libram, has been buried in an ocean in the belief that doing so will permanently banish the evil. Regrettably, over many years the living coral formed around such sources of intense evil start to act as a conduit for the essence of the despicable creature or reliquary imprisoned beneath the waves.

During daylight hours the water and the reef will typically be astonishingly beautiful with corals displaying rich colors and supporting a wide variety of marine wildlife. Those diving or fishing during daylight hours can take their pick from a bountiful harvest of rare fish and rich oyster beds. Natural predators, including sharks and barracuda may appear, but they are consistently docile during daylight hours.

 

Unfortunately, as soon as it gets dark the reef’s colors darken and black, dark green and purple veins start to appear within the coral - where they seem to connect and pulsate. This brings out the savage nocturnal inhabitants of the reef, which have the features, including in some cases the bioluminescent trickery, of marine life usually found in much deeper waters. Whether these vile creatures have lain hidden during the daylight, are only made manifest at night or are altered forms of the daytime creatures is not known for certain.

 

The creatures may well include species of Devil Fish, Angler Fish and similarly otherworldly predators. These appear alongside more familiar dangers such as Lionfish, sharks and octopuses, which are likely to have senses adapted to hunting at night.

It is easy enough to steer clear of immediate dangers simply by staying out of the water, but the coral won’t stop growing if left unattended. Beneath the surface the reef will increase its radius by as much as 10’ per week. Once it hits land the pace slows to 5’ per week, but the effects become deadlier. When rain or flowing water meets the coral on land it liquidizes patches of the dry coral. This releases clusters of marine predators capable of living on land or in the sea, e.g. octopuses and giant crabs.

Attacking the coral can slow the advance, but an established colony will usually grow faster than it gets worn down. The only firm solution is to locate the item or creature petrified within the reef and to remove it. This then presents the problem of dealing with the source of evil once it has been released, as it will usually only have been lying dormant. Once released such creatures are likely to be aggressive.

 

Climate and Terrain

 

Coastlines, river systems, forestation and other features of the landscape are suggested by choices of climate and terrain. Certain types of landscapes easily fit particular campaign challenges. For example, trenches are most easily dug in farmland. Alternatively, a GM may wish to select a combination of climate and terrain which is then adapted to the campaign. For instance, trenches might be carved into a glacier.

 

Climate and Terrain Table

D100

Landscape

Variants

1

Archipelago

 

2

Arête

 

3

Atoll

 

4

Beach

 

5

Bog

 

6

Bridges

 

7

Brush

 

8

Caldera

 

9

Cape

 

10

Causeway

 

11

Cave

 

12

Caverns

 

13

Chemical Lake

 

14

Chemical Pools

 

15

Chemical Streams

 

16

Chemical Waterfalls

 

17

Cliffs

 

18

Cloudforest

 

19

Coastline

 

20

Continent

 

21

Corrie

 

22

Couloir

 

23

Cove

 

24

Crater Lake

 

25

Currents

 

26

Delta

 

27

Desert

 

28

Drumlins

 

29

Dunes

 

30

Dustbowl

 

31

Escarpment

 

32

Estuary

 

33

Fields

 

34

Fjord

 

35

Flatlands

 

36

Flood Plain

 

37

Forest

 

38

Geyser

 

39

Glacier

 

40

Glade

 

45

Grotto

 

46

Hills

 

47

Island

 

48

Isle

 

49

Isthmus

 

50

Jungle

 

51

Lagoon

 

52

Lake or Loch

 

53

Lava Field

 

54

Levee

 

55

Magical Landscape

 

56

Maritime

 

57

Marsh

 

60

Mountains

 

61

Mudflats

 

62

Oasis

 

63

Ocean

 

64

Orchard

 

65

Pasture

 

66

Peninsular

 

67

Polder

 

68

Polluted Land

 

69

Pool

 

70

Prairie

 

71

Quarry

 

72

Rainforest

 

73

Rapids

 

74

Reef

 

75

Reservoir

 

76

Ridge

 

77

Rock Pavement

 

78

Salt Flats

 

79

Salt Lake

 

80

Sand Bar

 

81

Savanna

 

82

Sea

 

83

Seamount

 

84

Shore

 

85

Sinkhole

 

86

Stream or Burn

 

87

Swamp

 

88

Table Mountain

 

89

Taiga

 

90

Terrace

 

91

Terraces

 

92

Tides

 

93

Trench

 

94

Tundra

 

95

Volcano

 

96

Volcanoes

 

97

Waterfall

 

98

Weather System

 

99

Whirlpool

 

100

Woodland

 

 

Characters and Creatures

Deciding who to use to populate a game-world is discussed in more detail when looking at NPCs. The same topic comes up while commenting on colorful characters and in the tables at the end of the adventure builder, which cover a range of fantasy monsters. Selecting and detailing specific NPCs can happen at any stage in the design process, so the table here is simply for adding a general indication of the type of creatures that might be encountered in a region.

It is not really intended for rolling outcomes, as there may be more than one type of creature in an area and some creatures aren’t going to fit into all worlds, e.g. there’s nothing wrong with monsters and aliens, but most players keep SciFi and fantasy separate, as you typically end up with two sets of physics/ metaphysics.

In most cases this is one area where the world builder hands-off to a particular rule set with a wide range of monsters and the stats to accompany them.

 

Characters and Creatures Table

2D6

Type

Details

2

Aerial

 

3

Aliens

 

4

Aquatic

 

5

Deities

 

6

Humanoids

 

7

Humans

 

8

Monsters

 

9

Races

 

10

Tribes

 

11

Vegetation

 

12

Wildlife

 

 

Worship

 

The influence of campaign challenges and hazardous climates and landscapes may be key factors in shaping the myths and realities of a culture or a world’s creation. It’s often hard to say which among many factors, (including forms of worship/ philosophies, physics/ metaphysics, territorial boundaries and governance), drives the others.

Consequently, the tables looking at these factors can be approached in any order and matched to fit both campaign challenges and the physical landscape. It may also be helpful to combine a number of effects or outcomes, e.g. to arrive at a culture which sees their salvation in worshiping war and death.

 

Forms of Worship Table

2D12

Worship

Details

2

Agnostic

 

3

Atheistic

 

4

Chaos

 

5

Death

 

6

Elements/ Elemental

 

7

Ennead

 

8

Evil

 

9

Good

 

10

Harvests

 

11

Heretical

 

12

Heroes/ Celebrity

 

13

Law

 

14

Life

 

15

Messianic

 

16

Nature

 

17

Pantheon

 

18

Sabianism

 

19

Salvational

 

20

Shamanic

 

21

Triad

 

22

Villains

 

23

Warfare

 

24

Weather

 

Era/ Technologies

 

Eras and Technologies Table (Chronological)

2D10

Eras

Details

2

Savage Age

 

3

Hunter Gatherer or Nomadic

 

4

Stone Age aka Neolithic

 

5

Tribal Age

 

6

Bronze Age

 

7

Iron Age

 

8

Supernatural or Magical Age

 

9

Dark Age

 

10

Feudal or Medieval Age

 

11

Alchemical Age

 

12

Renaissance

 

13

Industrial Age

 

14

Steam Age

 

15

Digital Age

 

16

Nuclear Age

 

17

Ion Age

 

18

Fusion Age

 

19

Plasma Age

 

20

Telepathic Age

 

 

Territories

 

Territories Table

2D12

Territory

Details

2

Annexation

 

3

Barony

 

4

City State

 

5

Colony

 

6

Confederation or Federation

 

7

De-militarized Zone

 

8

District

 

9

Duchy

 

10

Empire

 

11

Frontier

 

12

Hunting Grounds

 

13

Landscape

 

14

Nation

 

15

National Park

 

16

Pasture

 

17

Principality

 

18

Republic

 

19

Royal Forest

 

20

Sacred Ground

 

21

Secure Zone

 

22

Sheikhdom

 

23

Tribal or Clan

 

24

Wilderness

 

 

Boundaries

 

Boundaries Table

2D10

Boundary

Details

2

Canyon

 

3

Desert

 

4

Dhrystone Dykes

 

5

Fencing

 

6

Fields

 

7

Forest

 

8

Fortifications

 

9

Glacier

 

10

Kill Zone

 

11

Mountain Range

 

12

No Man’s Land

 

13

River

 

14

Secure Zone

 

15

Sheikhdom

 

16

Stockade

 

17

Tribal or Clan

 

18

Trophies

 

19

Walls

 

20

Wilderness

 

 

Governance

Systems of government can shape many of the features of a culture. As a result they make a good starting point for fitting together campaign challenges and nation states, city states or empires. A city ruled by a military junta might, for example, make a good fit with a campaign challenge involving adventurers in an ongoing revolution.

 

Governance Table

D100

Governance

Details

1

Aliens

 

2

Anarchy

 

3

Angels

 

4

Aristocracy

 

5

Barbarians

 

6

Children

 

7

Civil Servants

 

8

Clerics

 

9

Conquerors

 

10

Corporations

 

11

Demons

 

12

Devils

 

13

Elders

 

14

Ethnic Group or Race

 

15

Fallen Angels

 

16

Foreign Ruler

 

17

Foreigners

 

18

Guilds

 

19

Heroes

 

20

Holy Men

 

21

Inexperienced Rulers

 

22

Infant Ruler

 

23

Judges

 

24

Junta

 

25

Magicians

 

26

Men

 

27

Merchants

 

28

Merit

 

29

Military

 

30

Mobs or Crowds

 

31

Money

 

32

Monsters

 

33

Nobility

 

34

Paramours

 

35

Plantation Owners

 

36

Prophet

 

37

Religious Law

 

38

Revolutionary Committee

 

39

Secret Police

 

40

Secret Ruler

 

41

Slave-Owners

 

42

Slaves

 

43

Specific Class or Race

 

44

Thieves

 

45

Tyrants

 

46

Wealth

 

47

Whim

 

48

Women

 

49

Words

 

50

Workers

 

 

States and Nations

 

With campaign challenges, the physical environment and a cultural framework in place it is up to a GM to decide how much further to drill down in advance. Trying to cover all of the possible features of even a small state is quite a task. However, the levels or layers that are already in place provide expectations or knock-on effects that are open to self-completion.

For example, staging a war involving the dark side of a planet half shrouded in perpetual darkness alongside a broadly European Iron Age culture is going to call for agriculture, commerce, events, customs and much more - all adapted to fit the campaign challenges, landscape and cultural outline already set in place.

As a result of cascading effects a quite general take on the major forms of agriculture and commerce are all that’s called for unless players’ characters choose to zoom in.

 

History

History Table

2D12

Episodes

Details

2

Apocalyptic

 

3

Bohemian

 

4

Cataclysmic

 

5

Civilized

 

6

Colonial

 

7

Cosmopolitan

 

8

Creative

 

9

Dynastic

 

10

Enslaved

 

11

Frontier

 

12

Imperial

 

13

Impoverished

 

14

Inventive

 

15

Magical

 

16

Mercantile

 

17

Militaristic

 

18

Monarchist

 

19

Parliamentary

 

20

Religious

 

21

Revolutionary

 

22

Scandal Ridden

 

23

Tyrannical

 

24

War-Torn

 

 

Currencies

 

Currencies Table

2D12

Currency

Details

2

Barter

 

3

Bird Eggs

 

4

Blood Money

 

5

Bloodletting

 

6

Coinage

 

7

Digital Currencies

 

8

DNA

 

9

Gems

 

10

Gold Coin

 

11

Gold Dust

 

12

Gold Standard

 

13

Grain

 

14

Ivory

 

15

Jade

 

16

Jewelry

 

17

Kills

 

18

Meat

 

19

Paper Money

 

20

Pearls

 

21

Property

 

22

Secrets

 

23

Slaves

 

24

Virtual Currencies

 

 

Festivals

 

Customs, Festivals, Rituals and Superstitions Table

2D20

Event

Details

2

Alien Languages

 

3

Beer Festival

 

4

Bland Food

 

5

Bloodletting

 

6

Carnival

 

7

Chanting

 

8

Cheese Chase

 

9

Competition

 

10

Country Fair

 

11

Draconian Laws

 

12

Dueling

 

13

Feast Day

 

14

Foreign Languages

 

15

Harvest

 

16

Jam Festival

 

17

Labyrinth Walking

 

18

Lottery

 

19

Midsummer

 

20

Midwinter

 

21

Military Law

 

22

New Fire

 

23

New Year

 

24

Night of the Dead

 

25

Pitfighting

 

26

Polluting

 

27

Procession

 

28

Public Executions

 

29

Religious Law

 

30

Sacred Dance

 

31

Sacrifice

 

32

Sacrifices

 

33

Spartan Existence

 

34

Spicy Food

 

35

Sporting Championship

 

36

Springtide

 

37

Stocks

 

38

Tombola

 

39

Wicker Man

 

40

Witchhunting

 

 

Weather and Sky Events

 

Weather and Sky Events Table

D100

 Event

Details

1

Afterglow

An afterglow is a high, wide arch of whitish or rosy light appearing in the sky due to fine particles of dust suspended in the high regions of the atmosphere. They can appear above the highest clouds as twilight deepens or be reflected from mountain  snowfields well after sunset

2

Airglow aka Nightglow

This is a weak light emitted by a planetary atmosphere

3

Alexander’s Band

There is a dark region between the two bows of a double rainbow. Light which is reflected by raindrops in this region of the sky cannot reach the observer

4

Auroral Light

 

5

Blizzard

 

6

Cloudseeding

Chemical, magical or nano-cloudseeding

7

Cold Snap

 

8

Comet

 

9

Constellation

 

10

Crepuscular Rays

 

11

Cyclone

 

12

Dew

 

13

Diamond Dust

Diamond dust is a ground-level cloud or mist made of minute ice crystals. It forms under clear or nearly clear skies and can occur anywhere with a temperature well below freezing

14

Double Rainbow

 

15

Downpour

 

16

Dust Whirls

 

17

Earthquake Lights

Such lights have shapes like the auroras, with a white to bluish hue, but can have a wider color spectrum. The light is seen for several seconds, but may last for tens of minutes

18

Eclipse

 

19

Enchantment

 

20

Fire Whirls

 

21

Fog

 

22

Frost

 

23

Gales

 

24

Glories

This effect forms a spectral figure in mist or cloud

25

Hail

 

26

Halo or Nimbus

Halos are colored or white arcs and spots in the sky made of ice crystals. They are usually near the sun or moon but can appear elsewhere, including the opposite part of the sky. They can form around artificial lights in cold weather when diamond dust is floating in the air

27

Hurricane

 

28

Intergalactic Collision

 

29

Lightning Storm

 

30

Meteor Shower

 

31

Meteorite

 

32

Mirage

 

33

Mist

 

34

Moon Pillars

These light pillars are formed by reflection from ice crystals with roughly horizontal faces. The light pillar is most visible when the Moon is low or lies below the horizon.

35

Planetary Conjunction

 

36

Planetary Shadow

The shadow that a planet may cast on its atmosphere. This shadow is often visible from the surface as a dark band in the sky - near the horizon around the times of sunset and sunrise

37

Rain

 

38

Rainbow

 

39

Sandstorm

 

40

Shower

 

41

Sleet

 

42

Smog

 

43

Snow

 

44

Snowstorm

 

45

Storm

 

46

Sun Pillars

These light pillars are formed by reflection from ice crystals with roughly horizontal faces. The light pillar is most visible when the Sun is low or below the horizon

47

Supernova

 

48

Thunderstorm

 

49

Tornado

 

50

Whirlwind

 

 

Transport and Communications

Transport and Communications Table

2D10

Type

Details

2

Aerial Runways

 

3

Aerial Walkways

 

4

Aircraft

 

5

Border Post

 

6

Canal

 

7

Canal Boat

 

8

Chariots

 

9

Coaches and Carriages

 

10

Highways

 

11

Lanes

 

12

Mines, Tunnels and Sewers

 

13

Roads

 

14

Spaceships

 

15

Starships

 

16

Tolls

 

17

Trains

 

18

Underground

 

19

Wagons

 

20

Yacht

 

 

Weaponry

Weaponry Table (Chronological)

2D20

Conditions

Details

2

Bones

 

3

Stones

 

4

Daggers

 

5

Catapults

 

6

Bows and Arrows

 

7

Axes

 

8

Swords

 

9

Cavalry Lances

 

10

Gunpowder

 

11

Musketry

 

12

Pistols

 

13

Guns

 

14

Pikes

 

15

Cannon

 

16

Poison Gas

 

17

Machine Guns

 

18

Armored Vehicles

 

19

Military Aircraft

 

20

Aircraft Carriers

 

21

Rockets

 

22

Nuclear Devices

 

23

Helicopters

 

24

Tactical Nuclear Devices

 

25

Golem Dust

 

26

Robots

 

27

Drones

 

28

Designer Viruses

 

29

Nano-Bots

 

30

Ion Devices

 

31

Fusion Devices

 

32

Plasma Devices

 

33

Cloaking

 

34

Light Sabre

 

35

Jump Ships

 

36

Tactical Spacestations

 

37

Strategic Spacestations

 

38

Interstellar Ships

 

39

Mass Gravity Technologies

 

40

Interstellar Spacestations

 

 

Commerce and Major Industries

 

Commerce and Major Industries Table

4D10

Conditions

Details

4

Aggregates

 

5

Arms Trading

 

6

Colonization

 

7

Conquest

 

8

Construction

 

9

Education

 

10

Entertainment

 

11

Espionage

 

12

Farming

 

13

Fishing

 

14

Forestry

 

15

Gambling

 

16

Gathering

 

17

Hemp

 

18

Herding

 

19

Hunting

 

20

Magic

 

21

Metallurgy

 

22

Military

 

23

Minerals

 

24

Mining

 

25

Orchards

 

26

Prospecting

 

27

Racketeering

 

28

Raiding

 

29

Salt Harvesting

 

30

Shellfish

 

31

Shipbuilding

 

32

Slavery

 

33

Sport

 

34

Strip Mining

 

35

Technology

 

36

Textiles

 

37

Tourism

 

38

Transport

 

39

Warfare

 

40

Whaling

 

 

Entertainments

 

Entertainments Table

D100

Conditions

Details

1

Amusement Parks

 

2

Archaeology

 

3

Art Exhibits

 

4

Boardgames

 

5

Bookkeepers

 

6

Busking

 

7

Casinos

 

8

Circuses

 

9

Comedy Clubs

 

10

Concerts

 

11

Dancing

 

12

Drama

 

13

Dueling

 

14

Exhibitions

 

15

Extreme Sports

 

16

Fairs

 

17

Fight Clubs

 

18

Films and Cinema

 

19

Fireworks

 

20

Hunting

 

21

Jousting

 

22

Magazines

 

23

Magic

 

24

Museums

 

25

Music

 

26

Newspapers

 

27

Nightclubs

 

28

Operas

 

29

Parades

 

30

Performance Art

 

31

Pit Fights

 

32

Plays

 

33

Promenading

 

34

Puppet Shows

 

35

Radio

 

36

Recordings

 

37

Roleplaying Games

 

38

Sailing

 

39

Snow Sports

 

40

Spectator Sports

 

41

Sports

 

42

Stand-Up Comedy

 

43

Street Theatre

 

44

Stunts and Escapology

 

45

Television

 

46

Theatre

 

45

Theme Parks

 

46

Trade Shows

 

47

Travelling Exhibitions

 

48

Variety Show

 

49

Video Games

 

50

Wax Museums

 

 

Landmarks, Buildings and Premises

 

Adding specific locations and local detail to a campaign now breaks down into identifying and populating suitable locations.

Unlike the earlier Locations Table the range of options is quite extensive. By this stage in a campaign design it becomes clear that adventure design within a campaign setting can loop back into the basic adventure design step-by-step set out earlier. The range of locations, landmarks, events and missions found there is more than sufficient to outline countless scenarios. However, campaigns often thrive on variety and experienced players need novelty to help to keep the gameplay fresh.

By noting down details of various landmarks, buildings and premises consistent with your campaign challenges it is easy to quickly sketch out large fortified or urban settlements, which combine to map whole nations in sufficient detail to support open-ended play and lots of player choice.

As in other areas, options that fit a typical fantasy setting or a space opera SciFi campaign may need to be adapted slightly to suit different genres. The largely generic options presented below can, therefore, be adapted slightly, e.g. a port or harbor can become an orbital spacestation, while a shipwright may act as an expert in designing and repairing starships.

Alternatively, take the next option down on the list until you get a suitable result. If that takes you over the end of a table just go back to the start.

 

Landmarks, Buildings and Premises Table

3D100

Structure

Conditions

3

Amphitheatre

 

4

Apartment

 

5

Apothecary’s

 

6

Aquarium

 

7

Aqueduct

 

8

Arcade

 

9

Arch

 

10

Architect’s

 

11

Archway

 

12

Arena

 

13

Armorer’s

 

14

Armory

 

15

Arsenal

 

16

Art Gallery

 

17

Asylum

 

18

Aviary

 

19

Bakery

 

20

Balcony

 

21

Bank

 

22

Bar

 

23

Barbican

 

24

Barge

 

25

Barn

 

26

Barracks

 

27

Barrow

 

28

Barrow

 

29

Basilica

 

30

Bathhouse

 

31

Baths

 

32

Bazaar

 

33

Bell Tower

 

34

Bivouac

 

35

Blacksmith’s

 

36

Brewery

 

38

Brick House

 

37

Bridge

 

39

Broch

 

40

Bunker

 

41

Butcher’s

 

42

Cabin

 

43

Cafe

 

44

Cages

 

45

Cairn

 

46

Campus

 

47

Canal

 

48

Candlestick Maker’s

 

49

Caravan

 

50

Carpenter’s

 

51

Cartwright

 

52

Casino

 

53

Castle

 

54

Catacomb

 

55

Cathedral

 

56

Causeway

 

57

Cave

 

58

Cavern

 

59

Cellar

 

60

Cellar, Root

 

61

Cellar, Storm

 

62

Cemetery

 

63

Cenotaph

 

64

Chandler’s

 

65

Chantry

 

66

Chapel

 

67

Chapter House

 

68

Church

 

69

Circus

 

70

Citadel

 

71

City

 

72

City Gate

 

73

City Hall

 

74

Clubhouse

 

75

Coliseum

 

76

College

 

77

Colossus

 

78

Column

 

79

Combat Arena

 

80

Concert Hall

 

81

Confectioner’s

 

82

Conservatory

 

83

Consulate

 

84

Convent

 

85

Cooper’s

 

86

Coppersmith’s

 

87

Cottage

 

88

Courthouse

 

89

Crannog

 

90

Croft

 

91

Crypt

 

92

Dairy

 

93

Dam

 

94

Debt Collector’s

 

95

Decorator’s

 

96

Depot

 

97

Derelict Building

 

98

Distillery

 

99

Docks

 

100

Dormitory

 

101

Dressmaker’s

 

102

Dry Docks

 

103

Dungeon

 

104

Embassy

 

105

Encampment

 

107

Execution Chamber

 

106

Exhibition

 

108

Factory

 

109

Falconer's

 

110

Farm

 

111

Farmhouse

 

112

Farrier’s

 

113

Field Hospital

 

114

Fish Market

 

115

Fletcher’s

 

116

Flotilla

 

117

Forge

 

118

Fort

 

119

Fortress

 

120

Forum

 

121

Foundry

 

122

Fruit Market

 

123

Funerary Temple

 

124

Galley

 

125

Garden

 

126

General Store

 

127

Goldsmith's

 

128

Granary

 

129

Grand Pavilion

 

130

Graveyard

 

131

Greenhouse

 

132

Grotto

 

133

Guard House

 

134

Guard Tower

 

135

Guildry

 

136

Gymnasium

 

137

Hamlet

 

138

Harbor

 

139

Harem

 

140

Hay Loft

 

141

Haymarket

 

142

Headquarters

 

143

Henge

 

144

Herald’s

 

145

Hide

 

146

High Temple

 

147

Hill Fort

 

148

Horse Inn

 

149

Hospice

 

150

Hospital

 

151

Hostel

 

152

Hotel

 

153

House

 

154

Houseboat

 

155

Hut

 

156

Ice Ring

 

157

Igloo

 

158

Inn

 

159

Ironmonger’s

 

160

Jail

 

161

Jeweler’s

 

162

Keep

 

163

Kiln

 

164

Laboratory

 

165

Labyrinth

 

166

Library

 

167

Lichway

 

168

Lighthouse

 

169

Livery

 

170

Livestock Market

 

171

Lumber Yard

 

172

Magazine

 

173

Magic/ Technology Shop

 

174

Manor

 

175

Mansion

 

176

Marina

 

177

Market

 

178

Mausoleum

 

179

Memorial

 

180

Memorial Chapel

 

181

Mezzanine

 

182

Military Headquarters

 

183

Mill

 

184

Millwright’s

 

185

Milner’s

 

186

Mines

 

187

Mint

 

188

Monastery

 

189

Monumental Statue

 

190

Mortuary

 

191

Mortuary Temple

 

192

Mud Baths

 

193

Museum

 

194

Nave

 

195

Nightclub

 

196

Observation Tower

 

197

Observatory

 

198

Office

 

199

Opera House

 

200

Opium Den

 

201

Oratory

 

202

Orphanage

 

203

Ossuary

 

204

Oubliette

 

205

Outpost

 

206

Pagoda

 

207

Palace

 

208

Parade Ground

 

209

Parliament

 

210

Pavilion

 

211

Pet Shop

 

212

Pillar

 

213

Pithead

 

214

Plantation

 

215

Plaza

 

216

Plumber’s

 

217

Pool

 

218

Port

 

219

Power Station

 

220

Priory

 

221

Prison

 

222

Prison Camp

 

223

Pueblo

 

224

Pyramid

 

225

Pyramid, Conical

 

226

Pyramid, Platform

 

227

Refinery

 

228

Reliquary

 

229

Resort

 

230

Restaurant

 

231

Rookery

 

232

Rosarium

 

233

Roundhouse

 

234

Ruins

 

235

Sanctuary

 

236

Sauna

 

237

Sawmill

 

238

School

 

239

Secret Garden

 

240

Sentry Post

 

241

Sepulcher

 

242

Sewer

 

243

Shack

 

244

Shed

 

245

Ship

 

246

Shipwright's

 

247

Shipyard

 

248

Shop

 

249

Shrine

 

250

Silversmith’s

 

251

Slaughterhouse

 

252

Slave Market

 

253

Slave Pits

 

254

Snow Cave

 

255

Soothsayer’s

 

256

Spa

 

257

Spice Market

 

258

Sports Arena

 

259

Stables

 

260

Stadium

 

261

Stage

 

262

Staging Post

 

263

Storm Cellar

 

264

Studio

 

265

Sty

 

266

Summer Palace

 

267

Swimming Pool

 

268

Tannery

 

269

Tattoo Shop

 

270

Tavern

 

271

Tax Collector’s

 

272

Tearoom

 

273

Temple

 

274

Tenement

 

275

Tent

 

276

Terminus

 

277

Theatre

 

278

Tide Mill

 

279

Tomb

 

280

Tower

 

281

Town

 

282

Townhouse

 

283

Trading Post

 

284

Tree House

 

285

Triumphal Arch

 

286

University

 

287

Verandah

 

288

Villa

 

289

Village

 

290

Wainwright’s

 

291

Warehouse

 

292

Watchtower

 

293

Watermill

 

294

Well House

 

295

Wheelwright’s

 

296

Windmill

 

297

Winery

 

298

Winter Palace

 

299

Ziggurat

 

300

Zoo

 

 

Conditions of Structures

 

The contents of the Conditions Table shown earlier are repeated here for ease of use.

 

Conditions of Structures Table

D100

Condition

Details

1

Alien

 

2

Brickwork

 

3

Buried

 

4

Busy

 

5

Buttressed

 

6

Camouflaged

 

7

Cobbled

 

8

Collapsing

 

9

Corroded

 

10

Decorative

 

11

Demolished

 

12

Derelict

 

13

Domed

 

14

Dusty

 

15

Earthwork

 

16

Enchanted

 

17

Exclusive

 

18

Exotic

 

19

Expensive

 

20

Flooded

 

21

Frosted

 

22

Gilded

 

23

Glass

 

24

Guarded

 

25

Haunted

 

26

Inexpensive

 

27

Ironwork

 

28

Irradiated

 

29

Laidback

 

30

Luxurious

 

31

Mosaic

 

32

Neglected

 

33

New

 

34

Opulent

 

35

Organic

 

36

Painted

 

37

Petrified

 

38

Plasterwork

 

39

Plated

 

40

Prosperous

 

41

Quiet

 

42

Renovated

 

43

Roofed

 

44

Royal Warrant

 

45

Ruined

 

46

Rundown

 

47

Stonework

 

48

Thatched

 

49

Tiled

 

50

Weathered

 

 

Alien, Exotic or Enchanted Structures

 

Alien, Exotic or Enchanted Structures Table

D20

Structural Feature

Details

1

Adaptive Camouflage

 

2

Corrosive

 

3

Enchanted Hearth

 

4

False Deformation

 

5

Foliage

 

6

Invisible Servants

 

7

Magic Fountain

 

8

Magnetic

 

9

Parasitic

 

10

Self-Destructive

 

11

Self-Repairing

 

12

Self-Replicating

 

13

Sentient

 

14

Stained Glass Structure

 

15

Standing Stones

 

16

Stealth Facility

 

17

Symbiotic

 

18

Unicorn Stables

 

19

Witches’ Cauldron

 

20

Zero-Gravity

 

 

Events

With campaign challenges, climates and landscapes, systems of government, political boundaries and settlements linked-up it is likely many plots and events will arise naturally during the course of play. At this stage it is possible to simply return to the pages on designing a basic adventure to sketch out adventures that fit alongside the framework of your campaign.

Some GMs may prefer to allow events to unfold, but others can find it useful to introduce specific events prompted by campaign challenges. Equally, they may wish to present background events and random encounters to keep adventurers guessing.

A few of the many possible events are set out below and it’s straightforward to loop back into the adventure builder and to fold together campaign challenges, the events shown here and various plots, missions and locations.

 

Events Table

D100

Event

Details

1

Arms Deal

 

2

Avalanche

 

3

Birthday Celebration

 

4

Cannibalism

 

5

Cold Snap

 

6

Comrade-At-Arms

 

7

Crime Wave

 

8

Cult

 

9

Drought

 

10

Earthquake

 

11

Economic Boom

 

12

Extreme Weather

 

13

Famine

 

14

Festival

 

15

Fire

 

16

Flooding

 

17

Gems

 

18

Gold Nugget

 

19

Guests

 

20

Heat Wave

 

21

Holiday

 

22

Holy War

 

23

Hurricane

 

24

Jailbreak

 

25

Jewels

 

26

Magic Mist

 

27

Mercenary

 

28

Merchant

 

29

Meteor Strikes

 

30

Mist

 

31

Monsters

 

32

Murder

 

33

Plague

 

34

Prisoner

 

35

Raiding

 

36

Rationing

 

37

Rebellion

 

38

Recurring Enemy

 

39

Riots

 

40

Rival Mages

 

41

Smuggling

 

42

Spying

 

43

Tornado

 

44

Trade War

 

45

Trader

 

46

Treasure Trove

 

47

Uprising

 

48

Vigilantes

 

49

Volcanic Eruption

 

50

Wedding